The Teaching Summary, Contents: The Channel Introduction, Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Summary, Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4 Chapter 5 Chapter 6 Chapter 7 Chapter 8 Chapter 9 Chapter 10 Appendix, Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 Part 5 Conclusion


Author's Note

There is one question which will inevitably be asked, should this Summary ever be read outside the small group of people who have watched the development of the Teaching. On what authority is it based? The only answer lies in the Summary itself, and especially in the ninth chapter.

     This Summary is an attempt to present, in a reasonable form, the principal ideas of the Teaching, and the Teaching is a written record of my recollected remembrances, over a period of nearly twenty years. These remembrances are ideas and answers my mind has received from another dimension.

     My chief difficulty lies in the selection of words. Until I started to write this Summary, there had been many rather random shots at the nearest equivalent, without regard to other associations. Now I am making an effort to find words with the common dictionary meaning, nearest to the meaning I need, using the Concise Oxford Dictionary, not from any personal prejudice, but because it is the only dictionary in my possession.

     In a work of this kind one is hampered by the different impressions words can convey. The church has a language all its own; science has another; a layman may use both in a sense quite different from the religious or the scientific meaning. Take for example the terms I have chosen, Conscious Mind, Supra­conscious Mind, and Eternal Mind. The church might prefer Body, Soul and Spirit. And science? What would science call an Eternal Mind? Continuous Personality? Certain words are offensive to one person and acceptable to the next.

     The Summary is not a religion but it could perhaps become a solvent between religions. Neither is it a scientific exposition. I wish it were, but that would have been outside my knowledge and beyond my power. To a man of science, given this experience, my account will seem a child's effort. Nevertheless it is accurate within the compass of my understanding and that is the best I can give.

     Kathleen Long, 1955


Biography

Kathleen Long was born in England on April 5th 1890, the youngest of three girls. Her father was a barrister and her mother a gifted pianist. The first twelve years of her life were spent near Guildford, when she developed her love of music, animals and exploring the countryside. In 1902 her father moved to Johannesburg to set up his own practice. Kathleen stayed on in England to finish her education, hoping to go to Oxford. Family circumstances prevented this, and she joined her father's office at the age of eighteen.

     Later in Portuguese East Africa she met her future husband. They married in January 1911 and she gave birth to two daughters and a son. Her husband held the post of Agent of the Union Government of South Africa as well as honorary British Consul and often acting Consul General. During this time Kathleen met many high ranking people and also experienced the wonderful world of the African bush, into which she made many trips.

     In 1928 the family moved to New Zealand where they settled on an eighteen acre farmlet near Nelson. They enjoyed the simple life­style, though it meant hard physical work and a struggle financially.

     Kathleen developed an interest in psychic matters and in 1932 the first group was formed that later led up to the channeling of the Teaching. Her husband showed little interest in this side of her life. They parted in 1937, and Kathleen dedicated the rest of her life to the psychic research work concerning the continuance of personality before birth and after death. The result of these thirty years of work, produced within four consecutive groups, has never been published. In the latter years of her life she wrote the Summary of the Teaching and her autobiography. Despite leading separate lives, Kathleen and her husband still continued caring for each other. He voluntarily paid her an allowance and when he had a terminal illness, Kathleen lovingly nursed him till he died. Kathleen herself died in Nelson on October 24th 1962 at the age of seventy two.


Photos


Kath at the age of about 22

Kath with her family in South Africa

Kath on a hunting trip in South Africa

Kath in her older years in New Zealand


The Teaching Summary, Contents: The Channel Introduction, Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Summary, Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4 Chapter 5 Chapter 6 Chapter 7 Chapter 8 Chapter 9 Chapter 10 Appendix, Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 Part 5 Conclusion


Introduction, P...

Summary, Conten...